Mind management is a mindfulness technique that allows you to step back and re-examine your thoughts. It acknowledges that our psychology has plenty to do with our physiology, and that our physical and mental wellbeing are inevitably intertwined. In mind management, you take each heavy, negative thought and reframe it in a manner that produces more motivational and productive output.

Mind Management 101: It’s About Both WHAT You Think and HOW You Think It.

Mind Management 101: It’s About Both WHAT You Think and HOW You Think It.

Heads up! Our posts may contain affiliate links. While this doesn’t affect you at all (you pay no more or less), we’ll receive a small commission, which helps us keep this whole show running. Thanks. ;)

Studies have long established that there is a hidden connection between our personal thoughts and the way they come to manifest physically in our lives over time.

For instance, negative emotions can have a huge bearing on our physical health. Aside from the way we act and project ourselves, it may be possible that we make ourselves susceptible to certain illnesses due to the long-term, biological effects of chronic mental and emotional states. Indeed, increased stress has been proven to have a significant impact on our physical and mental health.

So how do we deal with all this?

The Answer: Mind Management

Mind management is a mindfulness technique that allows you to step back and re-examine your thoughts. It acknowledges that our psychology has plenty to do with our physiology, and that our physical and mental wellbeing are inevitably intertwined.

In mind management, we take each heavy, negative thought and reframe it in a manner that produces more inspirational and productive output.

However, this is easier said than done. Plenty of distractions present themselves in our day-to-day lives, which may veer our minds off the ability of closely monitoring our inner thoughts.

Here are a few questions you should ask yourself, along with tips on how to step back and focus on managing your mind:

Is what you’re thinking necessary?

Plenty of stress comes from people’s fixation with the future and the possible heartaches it holds for them.

Thankfully, mindfulness, of which mind management is a subset of, practices removing oneself from the worries of the future and grounding oneself in the now.

Again, easier said than done. So how, exactly, do you do it?

There are a number of different methods, but one of the most rudimentary and effective is, of course, meditation. While mindfulness can be quite challenging to implement in the beginning (actually performing it isn’t hard, but remembering to perform it can be exceptionally hard), meditation can be easier in the sense that it requires a block of time that you schedule in daily. (Then you just have to exercise the discipline to actually stick to it.)

While there are endless techniques, styles, forms and even entire committed lifestyles to choose from across the course of meditation’s millennia-long history, there is one uniting factor amongst them all: the breath.

Mindfulness Tip: Your Breath is Always Now.

Really focussing on your breath and allowing your intrusive thoughts, along with any outside sounds, to come and go as they will without attaching yourself to them is a key factor while in meditation. The more you do this, the more you’ll notice this level of consciousness beginning to show up in other moments of your life: this is mindfulness beginning to sprout organically in your field of consciousness, as a result of the ‘work’ you’ve done in meditation.

At the same time, however, it is necessary not to beat up on yourself if you find you are getting distracted in meditation. Doing so is, as Eckhart Tolle has said, “a ‘no’ on top of a ‘no'”. Just notice it all and let it show up and pass along, as it will.

All of this will help you begin to recognize the regular torrent of wholly unnecessary (and often detrimental) unconscious ‘white noise’ thoughts we’re all subject to in every moment of our waking lives, which is a definite first step in the right direction.

Are your thoughts healthy, or are they negative and fearful?

Now that you may be a little more aware of which thoughts are ‘necessary’ or not, you can begin to evaluate their quality. In other words, you can begin to assess whether they’re positive and healthy or if they’re causing you yet another round of unnecessary stress by being negative and fearful.

Some of the most common negative thoughts include:

  • questioning why you haven’t achieved something
  • fixating on what you do not have
  • thinking about things that went ‘wrong’ in the past

While elements of these things may indeed require consideration if one is to manifest a better ‘now’ and resultant ‘future’, there’s often a subtle difference in the quality of focus that goes unnoticed after so many thousands of hours of automatic, unexamined, chronic thought.

Mindfulness Tip: A Problem & Solution Are The Same Thing, Experienced Differently.

Here it is a matter of allowing the emotional dimension into what has previously been an entirely mental realm — how does what you’re thinking FEEL as you’re in the act of thinking it?

It is entirely possible to consider the exact same thing in two polar opposite manners — if you find yourself ruminating, brooding, feeling anxious or worrying, you’re negatively focused and experiencing a problem; if you find yourself intuitive, calmly considering, rational and, at higher levels, reasonably hopeful and possibly even inspired and enthusiastic, you’re positively focused and experiencing a solution.

Can You think about the same thing in a joyful, or at least neutral, manner?

Ok, so you simply can’t help having these negative thoughts, even when you know you’re having them! You always find yourself coming full circle to all of your fearful concerns.

Don’t get discouraged!

Mindfulness is one of the most challenging undertakings we are capable of as human beings, so remember, even the smallest progress is momentous.

Your best bet here, if possible, is to simply go do something else. Allow yourself to be your miserable, anxious, grumbling self and take that self somewhere else, physically. Let it react to some different stimuli, something it enjoys, no matter how pointless or ‘time-wasting’ it may seem, or others may judge it to be. Give it a task to do. Occupy it. Just distract yourself long enough to let the negative loop you were in dissolve.

If you’re stuck where you are and just can’t get away or change the stimulus you’re experiencing, then stop trying. Be a miserable bastard! Let the negativity come out and express itself. Obviously, do your best to do so diplomatically enough that it doesn’t get you fired or landed in jail, but repressing it so often only leads to explosions down the road that may be wholly uncalled for relative to the situation that ‘triggered’ it. It is much better to aggressively low-temper these things over the long run when you’re out of all other options.  

Mindfulness Tip: Hold The Vision, Trust The Process

Adding onto the last point, what you truly want out of life often becomes much more clear when you’re feeling a little angry over things, as opposed to anxious or depressed. This can be a perfect time to list specific goals you want to reach, and outlining the steps you want to get there, and can be extremely helpful in developing a positive mindset, as it provides a feeling of personal empowerment.

While it is important not to become so focused on these goals that you end up shirking the day-to-day responsibilities of life (this is akin to becoming overly attached to results, one of the primary ‘no-no’s’ of this blog, and all spiritual teachings in general), life is a relative thing, and there are times when holding the vision of those goals, and remembering to trust the process, long-term, is the best thing you can do.

Not only is checking things off this list extremely satisfying (even if it’s only one thing), it also helps give you a feeling of accomplishment and progress, which in turn produces positive emotions by stimulating all those feel-good hormones we read so much about in a natural (i.e not drug-induced) manner.

Keep yourself grounded by remembering that the small, everyday goals many of us take for granted are indeed accomplishments, and that, even with the bigger stuff, as they say, ‘Rome wasn’t built in a day’.

The Takeaway: Manage the Mind, Manage the Body

Overall wellness can only be achieved if we truly invest time in all parts of our body–what so many people seem to forget is that this includes our mind! This powerful center of our being can sometimes get so weighed down by negativity and stress that it sabotages our physical health and our relationships with others, not to mention our life goals. Avoid that scenario by learning to manage your mind in a manner that works for you.

Follow Us

FacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagramFacebooktwitterpinterestrssinstagram

Popular Posts

Feeds

Newsletter

ONE PILL, DAILY.

(In email form)

Studies have long established that there is a hidden connection between our personal thoughts and the way they come to manifest physically in our lives over time.

For instance, negative emotions can have a huge bearing on our physical health. Aside from the way we act and project ourselves, it may be possible that we make ourselves susceptible to certain illnesses due to the long-term, biological effects of chronic mental and emotional states. Indeed, increased stress has been proven to have a significant impact on our physical and mental health.

So how do we deal with all this?

The Answer: Mind Management

Mind management is a mindfulness technique that allows you to step back and re-examine your thoughts. It acknowledges that our psychology has plenty to do with our physiology, and that our physical and mental wellbeing are inevitably intertwined.

In mind management, we take each heavy, negative thought and reframe it in a manner that produces more inspirational and productive output.

However, this is easier said than done. Plenty of distractions present themselves in our day-to-day lives, which may veer our minds off the ability of closely monitoring our inner thoughts.

Here are a few questions you should ask yourself, along with tips on how to step back and focus on managing your mind:

Is what you’re thinking necessary?

Plenty of stress comes from people’s fixation with the future and the possible heartaches it holds for them.

Thankfully, mindfulness, of which mind management is a subset of, practices removing oneself from the worries of the future and grounding oneself in the now.

Again, easier said than done. So how, exactly, do you do it?

There are a number of different methods, but one of the most rudimentary and effective is, of course, meditation. While mindfulness can be quite challenging to implement in the beginning (actually performing it isn’t hard, but remembering to perform it can be exceptionally hard), meditation can be easier in the sense that it requires a block of time that you schedule in daily. (Then you just have to exercise the discipline to actually stick to it.)

While there are endless techniques, styles, forms and even entire committed lifestyles to choose from across the course of meditation’s millennia-long history, there is one uniting factor amongst them all: the breath.

Mindfulness Tip: Your Breath is Always Now.

Really focussing on your breath and allowing your intrusive thoughts, along with any outside sounds, to come and go as they will without attaching yourself to them is a key factor while in meditation. The more you do this, the more you’ll notice this level of consciousness beginning to show up in other moments of your life: this is mindfulness beginning to sprout organically in your field of consciousness, as a result of the ‘work’ you’ve done in meditation.

At the same time, however, it is necessary not to beat up on yourself if you find you are getting distracted in meditation. Doing so is, as Eckhart Tolle has said, “a ‘no’ on top of a ‘no'”. Just notice it all and let it show up and pass along, as it will.

All of this will help you begin to recognize the regular torrent of wholly unnecessary (and often detrimental) unconscious ‘white noise’ thoughts we’re all subject to in every moment of our waking lives, which is a definite first step in the right direction.

Are your thoughts healthy, or are they negative and fearful?

Now that you may be a little more aware of which thoughts are ‘necessary’ or not, you can begin to evaluate their quality. In other words, you can begin to assess whether they’re positive and healthy or if they’re causing you yet another round of unnecessary stress by being negative and fearful.

Some of the most common negative thoughts include:

  • questioning why you haven’t achieved something
  • fixating on what you do not have
  • thinking about things that went ‘wrong’ in the past

While elements of these things may indeed require consideration if one is to manifest a better ‘now’ and resultant ‘future’, there’s often a subtle difference in the quality of focus that goes unnoticed after so many thousands of hours of automatic, unexamined, chronic thought.

Mindfulness Tip: A Problem & Solution Are The Same Thing, Experienced Differently.

Here it is a matter of allowing the emotional dimension into what has previously been an entirely mental realm — how does what you’re thinking FEEL as you’re in the act of thinking it?

It is entirely possible to consider the exact same thing in two polar opposite manners — if you find yourself ruminating, brooding, feeling anxious or worrying, you’re negatively focused and experiencing a problem; if you find yourself intuitive, calmly considering, rational and, at higher levels, reasonably hopeful and possibly even inspired and enthusiastic, you’re positively focused and experiencing a solution.

Can You think about the same thing in a joyful, or at least neutral, manner?

Ok, so you simply can’t help having these negative thoughts, even when you know you’re having them! You always find yourself coming full circle to all of your fearful concerns.

Don’t get discouraged!

Mindfulness is one of the most challenging undertakings we are capable of as human beings, so remember, even the smallest progress is momentous.

Your best bet here, if possible, is to simply go do something else. Allow yourself to be your miserable, anxious, grumbling self and take that self somewhere else, physically. Let it react to some different stimuli, something it enjoys, no matter how pointless or ‘time-wasting’ it may seem, or others may judge it to be. Give it a task to do. Occupy it. Just distract yourself long enough to let the negative loop you were in dissolve.

If you’re stuck where you are and just can’t get away or change the stimulus you’re experiencing, then stop trying. Be a miserable bastard! Let the negativity come out and express itself. Obviously, do your best to do so diplomatically enough that it doesn’t get you fired or landed in jail, but repressing it so often only leads to explosions down the road that may be wholly uncalled for relative to the situation that ‘triggered’ it. It is much better to aggressively low-temper these things over the long run when you’re out of all other options.  

Mindfulness Tip: Hold The Vision, Trust The Process

Adding onto the last point, what you truly want out of life often becomes much more clear when you’re feeling a little angry over things, as opposed to anxious or depressed. This can be a perfect time to list specific goals you want to reach, and outlining the steps you want to get there, and can be extremely helpful in developing a positive mindset, as it provides a feeling of personal empowerment.

While it is important not to become so focused on these goals that you end up shirking the day-to-day responsibilities of life (this is akin to becoming overly attached to results, one of the primary ‘no-no’s’ of this blog, and all spiritual teachings in general), life is a relative thing, and there are times when holding the vision of those goals, and remembering to trust the process, long-term, is the best thing you can do.

Not only is checking things off this list extremely satisfying (even if it’s only one thing), it also helps give you a feeling of accomplishment and progress, which in turn produces positive emotions by stimulating all those feel-good hormones we read so much about in a natural (i.e not drug-induced) manner.

Keep yourself grounded by remembering that the small, everyday goals many of us take for granted are indeed accomplishments, and that, even with the bigger stuff, as they say, ‘Rome wasn’t built in a day’.

The Takeaway: Manage the Mind, Manage the Body

Overall wellness can only be achieved if we truly invest time in all parts of our body–what so many people seem to forget is that this includes our mind! This powerful center of our being can sometimes get so weighed down by negativity and stress that it sabotages our physical health and our relationships with others, not to mention our life goals. Avoid that scenario by learning to manage your mind in a manner that works for you.

SUBSCRIBE

Don’t worry — we won’t overload your inbox! At this point we only publish once a week, and you are free to unsubscribe at anytime. All of our user’s data is 100% safe-guarded, and you’ll only, ever, hear from us.

Subscribe to Our Newsletter!

Don’t worry — we won’t overload your inbox! At this point we only publish once a week, and you are free to unsubscribe at anytime. All of our user’s data is 100% safe-guarded, and you’ll only, ever, hear from us.